Wonder Woman’s Iconic Symbol Has a Hidden Meaning Fans Need to Know

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The iconic Wonder Woman emblem is not only the signature logo of the Amazonian superheroine but also a meaningful symbol of her heritage and World War II-era origins. For the majority of Wonder Woman’s history, her logo has been an eagle, tying into her costume’s American iconography, but given her background as an Amazon warrior, the symbol holds additional meaning, which the post-Flashpoint DC Universe only expands. Furthermore, by combining Wonder Woman’s two identities, the symbol expresses status as more than just a superhero.

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Chest emblems are perhaps the most common feature of superhero costumes, with varying in-universe reasons for their use. In Superman’s case, the “S” logo is actually the symbol of the Kryptonian House of El, representing hope. Batman’s emblem, in some iterations, is meant to draw gunfire toward the most protective area on his armored suit. The emblem of Wonder Woman is no less meaningful, representing Diana Prince’s past and present and taking on new meaning in DC’s current continuity.

Related: Wonder Woman’s Complete Costume History – Her Best Costumes Ever

Wonder Woman debuts in issue 8 of All-Star Comics (co-created by William Moulton Marston and Harry G. Peter), which depicts her United States-themed costume with a golden bald eagle logo. The eagle has remained a consistent component of Wonder Woman’s outfit (though it was replaced by a pair of stacked W’s between 1982 and 2006), and while it is an obvious component of her WWII-era American patriotism, it is also relevant to her Greek heritage. The bald eagle is the national animal of the United States, but the golden eagle is a symbol of Zeus, so Wonder Woman’s logo, by being a gold-colored bald eagle, can be interpreted as representing both. This not only highlights Wonder Woman’s status as an immigrant but also becomes more relevant following the New 52’s changes to Diana’s origin.


Wonder Woman Is Both A Superhero & An Immigrant

Throughout their genre’s history, superheroes have been used as metaphors for immigration, which is fitting, considering how many major DC and Marvel heroes are created by immigrants (or first-generation Americans). For Wonder Woman, this quality is far more literal than metaphorical, as she leaves her fictional home nation of Themyscira and becomes an American citizen, holding onto her heritage while embracing her new home as she fights against fascism and all forms of hatred and intolerance. The simultaneously Greek and American meaning of her logo makes it a perfect embodiment of her immigrant status.

How The New 52 Made Wonder Woman’s Eagle Symbol More Meaningful.

For most of Wonder Woman’s history, she had been a clay sculpture given life by her mother Hippolyta and the Greek pantheon, but the post-Flashpoint DC Universe has reestablished her as the biological daughter of Hippolyta and Zeus. Fittingly, Wonder Woman’s eagle logo has become more prominent on her post-Rebirth costume, which further represents her heritage in her latest star-spangled superhero outfit. While perhaps a somewhat overlooked costume detail, Wonder Woman’s eagle logo is one of her outfit’s most important elements, representing her “old country,” her new home, and her Olympian heritage.

Next: Black Adam vs Wonder Woman Was Already Settled by DC



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Denis Ava
Denis Avahttps://allbusinessreviews.org/
Denis Ava is mainly a business blogger who writes for Biz Grows. Rather than business blogs he loves to write and explore his talents in other niches such as fashion, technology, travelling,finance,etc.

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